The Future of Digital
Student Data Portability

Programme for 2016 Groningen Declaration Network Annual Meeting

May 18, 2016

Words of Welcome

9 a.m.-9:20 a.m.

  • Words of welcome by Victoriano Giralt, President, Groningen Declaration Network; Joe Samuels, CEO, SAQA and this year's host; and by the peak representatives from the three main coveners: AACRAO, DUO, and NSC.

Opening Keynote: Shared Global Visions, Shared Global Concerns

9:20 a.m.-10 a.m.

In our increasingly inter-connected world, data travel at the speed of light. Not so with human capital mobility, which has a different pace (and happily so ...). Still, for the planet to flourish, people need to travel, be able to pick up skills, and subsequently bring their skills in - be it as a student, an academic researcher, a skilled worker or otherwise. While physical movement of humans at he speed of light may perhaps never occur, we all appreciate if the administrative processes that govern human mobility do. And this Network is convinced they can. If we agree on this, what can we do to further foster human capital mobility? Which avenues for cooperation are waiting to be brought to life and benefit the global community in furthering bona fide human capital mobility?

AQVN: African Qualifications Verification Network Report

10 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

The African Qualifications Verification Network (AQVN) consists of 14 African countries (South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Ghana, Namibia, Botswana, Malawi, Tanzania, Gabon, DRC, Kenya, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) committed to promote genuine qualifications and to build trust in African qualifications through the elimination of qualifications fraud. It was established at a meeting hosted by SAQA in November 2014. These countries have adopted a Joint Declaration on building trust and promoting genuine qualifications on the African continent. SAQA provides the secretariat for the AQVN. The long-term vision of the AQVN is to drive sustainable cooperation among African nations and cement relationships. Through these partnerships and increased capacity to verify qualifications as well as the establishment of the necessary infrastructure, skills and the sharing of knowledge the AQVN will be used to concretely contribute to building an Africa-wide network that will support the objectives of the Addis Convention, signed in December 2014. A key objective of the Addis Convention is promoting mobility of learners and professionals across the African continent. Through the public launching of the AQVN it will be given the necessary visibility and profile so that it can be strengthened and expanded. The AQVN at its launch wants to explore innovative ways including digital and other time and cost effective means to verify foreign qualifications. As part of its plans for expansion organisations that have been invited to participate in the launch are from the SADC region as well as other countries such as Ghana, Uganda, Kenya, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Gabon, and Nigeria. The launch will furthermore focus on setting up the necessary governance structures to ensure a well run and a well-functioning organization. Partnerships with organizations will a similar interest will be sought through the Groningen Declaration Network as well as the establishment of joint projects including pilot projects on digitization, sharing of expertise and information, funding, etc.

ETS on Microcredentials and Learning Outcome Assessment Suites

11 a.m.-11:15 a.m.

ETS has developed assessments that measure complex traditional and non-cognitive skills for higher education learners and institutions. We have been working on ways to present stakeholders with certification of students’ achievements as documented in part by these assessments. ETS assessments can provide valid and reliable evidence of knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) at a more granular-level than those obtained by conventional degrees and transcripts. These micro-credentials can be represented as digital badges or certificates with linked data that provides evidence and context for their claims. Such metadata could include descriptions of the issuer, the KSAs obtained, the method of assessment, the established criteria of proficiency, the quality of performance, and the time period of validity for the claims. Micro-credentialing is gaining momentum and is advantageous for individuals, HEIs, and employers. The newly-developed HEIghten Outcomes Suite will include micro-credential options. HEIghten is an innovative, modular, computer-delivered assessment tool that enables colleges and universities to measure the student learning outcomes that are essential for academic success. Test takers who complete these HEIghten assessments receive a total score and the proficiency level achieved, which is then combined into a micro-credential that serves as a reliable claim with evidence of the KSAs that educators and employers value.

Eclectic Degrees and Where They Fit in the PARADIGMS Project to Handle New Ways of Recognition

11 a.m.-11:15 a.m.

Automatic recognition has been on the agenda with the ENIC-NARIC network for a while now. And the topic of eclectic degrees has recently been added in an Erasmus+ project on ‘New Paradigms in Recognition’. Which may represent the way higher education programmes will transform within the next decade, by offering alternative modes of delivery and crediting. The PARADIGMS project will deal with ways to grant recognition to non-traditional education, and eclectic degrees will be part and parcel of the approach. New developments in digital student data and e-credentials might give recognition of eclectic degrees a headstart.

W3C’s Verifiable Claims Task Force: An Update

11 a.m.-11:15 a.m.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)’s Verifiable Claims Task Force was convened to investigate a user-centric standard for expressing and transacting verifiable claims (eg credentials and attestations)  via the Web.  Verifiable claims impact all sectors of the global economy such as education, finance, healthcare, retail and government. The development of an interoperable and standards-based exchange of an individual’s verifiable claims between identity services and across industries is gaining urgency and worldwide attention. In this session, Dr. Matthew Pittinsky (Parchment, Arizona State University) will present an overview of the work to date of the Verifiable Claims Task Force, introduce its proposed charter, current efforts, implications for global exchange, and opportunities for community support and participation.

The Fundamental Key to Global Interoperability: an International School Code List

11:20 a.m.-11:35 a.m.

The number of students traveling abroad or crossing borders for higher education continues to grow each year. According to NAFSA, the number of US students studying abroad for credit in 2014 grew 5.2% to over 304,000 students. The number of international students studying in the US, according to IIE for the same period, is 975,000, of which approximately 78,000 study in California and of that, 10,000 enroll at the University of Southern California (the largest number of international students in the US). A major barrier though exists in the lack of a common school identifier or school code list, which forces manually intensive, workaround processes for every college and university to ensure data accuracy and integrity. AACRAO SPEEDE and PESC have joined forces to launch an effort to address this difficult problem. Should there be one school code list? Should there be a standardized methodology in assigning school codes instead? This session will discuss the global intricacies faced and how we might partner with the Groningen Declaration Network to assist and address this fundamental flaw in higher education.

Erasmus without Paper (EWP) – an Update

11:20 a.m.-11:35 a.m.

Most Student Information Systems (SIS) of European Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) process and store student data electronically. But the actual data are still often sent as documents and/or in a scanned form. The EWP project aims to design and implement a pilot for a federated network of trusted users with commonly agreed technological standards, interconnecting HEI Student Information Systems with various kinds of software and standards. Security is a crucial issue as well as the use cases. These were designed using the input from a questionnaire that reached more than 1000 European HEIs. At present the APIs are being designed and the data models fine-tuned. Interoperability is the keyword. The EWP consortium aims at bringing this vision alive by piloting the completely digital processing of Erasmus + student exchanges concentrating on 5 processes that require intensive communication: inter-institutional agreements, nominations of students, the learning agreement (this is the central issue), arrival and departure dates, the host transcript of records (ToR, results obtained abroad) and the home ToR (final officially recognized and converted results). Automatic reporting is also envisaged to the Erasmus+ central Mobility Tool Plus. Alignment will be sought with existing standards outside Europe as well.

Beyond the Blockchain: Adding Trust to Digital Credentials

11:20 a.m.-11:35 a.m.

As universities begin to translate more of their student credentials into digital form, being able to efficiently and accurately verify this data in a manner that is agnostic to file format (PDF, XML, etc.) takes on greater importance. We propose a novel method for credential verification based on concepts present in the blockchain, and examine how our solution, centered around cryptographic data structures called transparency logs, can be an easier, more flexible, and more cost-efficient way for universities to digitally verify credentials than existing options such as digitally-signed PDF's. Further, we argue that using transparency logs is a better solution than relying on the blockchain itself, because transparency logs offer many of the benefits of a blockchain-based system without the added complexity. Finally, we look ahead to future possibilities for a system that uses cryptographic data structures for widespread credential verification.

Verified Digital Credentials in Web-based Admissions (I)

11:40 a.m.-11:55 a.m.

Stretched session, covering 2 consecutive slots (30 minutes) Digitary, Educational Perspectives, CollegeNET, and Stanford have teamed up to provide electronic credential attachment, evaluation and verification, and admissions document collation for 100% of Stanford's international graduate applicants. Over 25 other major US graduate programs have also contracted to participate in this new integrated service. Instead of separately obtaining their credentials from central depositories and then checking later to ensure receipt of their documents by the receiving institution, students can directly initiate attachment and collation of their credentials as they apply. Panelists will demonstrate that the service works, regardless of a student's credentials being digitized or paper based. If the student's digitized documents reside in electronic depositories that are already integrated into the network—e.g. from India, China, and Ireland--the student can directly attach their credentials to their electronic application. If the student is able to provide only paper based credentials, he/she can upload these automatically for verification and evaluation by a NACES-member organisation, regardless of where in the world they have studied. These fully vetted records are then automatically attached to their college application(s) through the Digitary/CollegeNET hub. This globally integrated solution enables receiving institutions, like Stanford, to offer verified electronic delivery and attachment service to 100% of their international applicants, thereby reducing the collation and verification workload on their admissions teams.

Enabling the Portability of Education Data: Transporting and Data Exchange

11:40 a.m.-11:55 a.m.

The need to exchange and share education data among stakeholders is becoming more and more prevalent. Many sectors, or communities of interest, work together to build necessary infrastructure and networks to enable their specific needs. Most sectors, though, do not have the ability to serve other sectors, resulting in the ability only to communicate within the sector, but not outside it. With the number of directory services and federations growing, our panel will help attendees understand some of the major data exchange initiatives emerging. Topics include: Needs and expectations in the Registrar and Admissions sector, including GREENE, and perspectives from the AACRAO SPEEDE Committee; State- and Province-based needs where regional federations are now emerging; and several of PESC’s initiatives including EdExchange, an open, peer-to-peer web services network that enables digital exchange of standards-based data and digital documents between academic institutions and their service providers; and the recently established Global Data Mobility User Group, formed to link all Groningen Declaration Network activities and efforts directly to PESC.

InAcademia.org: Simple Affiliation Validation for Academia

11:40 a.m.-11:55 a.m.

Identity Federations in Research and Education currently support the delivery of attributes using SAML authentication interfaces of their federations. Although Service Providers that only need validation can join a federation and use the attributes provided by an Identity provider to do their own assessment, there are downsides to that approach. One is that a federation Service Provider needs to live up to a rather heavyweight federation policy, put in place amongst others to protect user privacy: but if the Service Provider would not receive that privacy sensitive information in the first place, then maybe a much lighter policy can be used. Another is the SAML protocol itself, which is considered by many to be rather cumbersome to implement and maintain; especially if the only functionality that is needed is a simple assurance that a provided claim by someone is correct; functionality that SAML does not even provide since it was designed with authentication and providing attributes in mind (not validating them). In recent years new protocols such as OpenID Connect have emerged which are equally suitable for secure attribute transportation, but come with significantly lower technical impact. These downsides can mostly be addressed by creating a single transnational validation service. This can be a service provider in the national federations (via eduGAIN) with the accompanying policy. Towards the services that only need validation, it can provide the validation service. This means an attribute release profile with anonymous attributes combined with user-consent can be used, possibly also allowing a much lighter policy.

To be Apostilled or not, that is the question

noon-12:15 p.m.

The Apostille Convention of 1961 is an international treaty drafted by the Hague Conference on Private International Law. It specifies the modalities through which a document issued in one of the signatory countries can be certified for legal purposes in all the other signatory states. This certification protocol has been adopted by the co-signers for legalization of documents including education documents. Technology evolutions have created an environment where there is the potential to eliminate the need to require the Apostille by the receiving entity. Learn about this promising pilot featuring 4 countries in the Iberia-Americas region.

Multiple Stakeholders, One Vision: PESC’s Standard in Global Collaboration and Interoperability

noon-12:15 p.m.

PESC’s core mission as a non-profit association, is to lead the establishment and adoption of data standards across education and PESC serves as a standards-setting body, including development, maintenance and training. The goals of the mission are to enable the improvement of institutional performance and foster collaboration across educational communities in order to lower costs, improve service, and attain system interoperability. With a vibrant volunteer base making up a strong PESC community, the strategic path for PESC calls for continued development of common data standards, establishment and support of data networks and infrastructure, common authentication and web services protocols enterprise-wide, seamless connections bridging postsecondary education systems to secondary and labor and workforce systems, and an eye on emerging technologies like social networking. Panelists will discuss the latest emerging initiatives EdExchange, Common Credential, the Canadian PESC User Group, the Global Data Mobility User Group, PESC Data Summits and highlight where PESC Approved Standards are being used.

Common Parallel Sessions Wrap Up

12:20 p.m. - 12:30 p. m.

We come back together and do a quick update to the plenary on what went on in the parallels

Panel Discussion: Verification Policy and Best Practices

12:30 p.m.-1 p.m.

DRAFT ABSTRACT In September 2015, the Groningen Declaration Network's Executive Committee established the Verifications Policy and Best Practices Task Force. That Task Force quickly grew into a global community of experts that share the conviction that verification policy and best practices will pave the way for the global acceptance of digital student data as "legal skills tender" which in its turn will ultimately power global human capital cross border mobility. Task Force members will discuss the TF's achievements and challenges and would very much like to get your feedback on the TF's remit and its future work.

UNESCO Keynote: Preparing for a Global Convention on Recognition of Higher Education Qualifications

1 p.m.-1:30 p.m.

The global population of mobile students has doubled since 2002, and is now around 4 million students studying outside their home countries. By 2020, about 8 million students might study abroad. In 2012, at least 4 million students studied outside their home country. At the same time, the global student population has grown from around 30 million students to almost 200 million students by 2016. The massive growth in both student population and mobile students calls for a global regulatory framework for recognition: to make it easier to be mobile both for students and job seekers. UNESCO is currently looking into the possibilities for preparing a global convention of recognition of higher education qualifications. The aims of a global convention would be to raise awareness on recognition at policy level and to facilitate international cooperation and mobility. A global convention could also raise awareness on the world moving towards a global higher education community, and to support capacity building and quality enhancement in higher education.
The quality work the Groningen Declaration network is doing to facilitate student mobility will have positive impact on the current work UNESCO is preparing for global convention on recognition when it comes to showcase good practice on mobility and recognition issues. UNESCO will establish a drafting committee of representatives from all regions in the world. The committee will draft a preliminary global convention to show what it might look like. The preliminary draft will be discussed at the UNESCO General Conference in November 2017 where further steps towards a global convention will be discussed.

Signing Ceremony

3 p.m.-10 p.m.

18:40-19:00
Signing Ceremony

May 19, 2016

Showcasing Pilots

9 a.m.-11 a.m.

In just 120 minutes, six or seven pilot projects will be showcased, in alphabetical order as follows: Australia - Update on the Digital Student Data Task Force and the Australian - New Zealand Regional Hub China - Updates on CHESICC's ongoing international pilots India - Update on NAD Development USA - National Student Clearinghouse global pilot updates Netherlands-Flanders (Belgium) - Update on e-Enrolment Nordic countries, Poland and Italy - EMREX: Rolling Out Down South? Update on EMREX France - Verifdiploma and the Fench Ministry of Education Digital Verification Project

Update on Universities Australia's Road Towards the National Digital Student Academic Record Data Management Solution

9 a.m.-9:15 a.m.

Australia's Digital Student Data Task Force has made big strides since it came into being in 2013. Neil Robinson will update us on the outcome of the Expression of Interest that has gone out late last year and which will hopefully lead to the development of a regional node that will serve both Australia's and New Zealand's graduates and students.

CHESICC Update

9:15 a.m.-9:30 a.m.

Thanks to its dedication to authoritative and credible verification and transmission services, CHESICC has been able to steadily build up its network of partners in the digital student data ecosystem, to promote global student record mobility in partnership with evaluation agencies, data exchange companies and educational institutions. This presentation introduces CHESICC's pilot programs with its partners in the USA and in Europe. While focusing on technical development and customer service, presenters will also pay attention to student privacy and application procedure. For the near future, CHESICC will be investing in further expanding its services, which will count, next to CHESICC's qualification and transcript verification service, a multi-dimensional credentials evaluation service which may provide more detail about institutions, majors, and students. CHESICC may also be releasing new verification services, and lastly, may add new levels of granularity to student's verification reports, by providing these with GPA, Gaokao cut-off tier lines, and more.

C-NAD, CDSL's National Academic Depository Update

9:30 a.m.-9:45 a.m.

CDSL’s National Academic Depository(C-NAD) has been conceptualized to hold all types of Academic awards offered by Academic Institutions in digital form. C-NAD aims at doing away with difficulties of collecting, maintaining and presenting physical paper certificates. It will also verify the awards issued by various Academic Institutions to Individuals. C-NAD brings in deterrence factor for people who wish to think that paper certificates can be easily forged / created. Additional benefits of the C-NAD are:  Develop a broader overview of the Education sector and provide trends, observations and analytics on Enrollment, Progression, Preferences, etc. on a centralized national database.  Obviate the need to generate true copies of awards. The Depository has overcome a few challenges, with respect to Academic diversity in terms of types of awards and the audience which ranged from high school-goers to those who are employed/employable, hardware, software, logistics and acceptance of C-NAD. It needs collaborative efforts of IT, education, planning, legal and media professionals. If planned meticulously and established successfully, the C-NAD would be useful to the Student, educational faculty, employers and other agencies who wish to access/verify students’ academic details. C-NAD: A Digital, Online, Trusted, Verifiable system which is accessible in a secure manner to all authorized users at all times.

National Student Clearinghouse Global Pilots Update

9:45 a.m.-10 a.m.

The National Student Clearinghouse’s (NSC) pilots continue to move toward a fully integrated model of electronic educational document transference within the G.R.E.E.N. Principles, a framework for international data exchange which has been incorporated into the GDN core principles. The Pilot with China’s three education sub ministries are the most advanced and there have been many lessons learned along the way. NSC will briefly discuss this pilot from its perspective including the progress to standards development. We will also discuss a very important development in credential evaluation between the USA and China that is underway as a result of this pilot.

EMREX: Rolling out Data Transfer Services for Mobile Students in Nordic Countries and Beyond

10 a.m.-10:15 a.m.

EMREX is an ERASMUS+ project which focuses on the electronic exchange of student achievement records between Higher Education Institutions. Now that after the first half of the project life time the EMREX platform is up and running, a specific EMREX-ELMO data standard is designed and published on GitHub. Most of the participating countries have integrated (in a federated way) their production Student Information Systems with the platform. A field trial study is underway, first groups of students have transferred their records from host to home institutions, evaluation of the project results based on surveys and data collected in university registers is on the way. Project partners are looking into the future. The solution is evaluated from a technical perspective to smooth the path for newcomers to join the EMREX network. New user scenarios are being recognized, like supporting internal mobility, admission to educational institutions, recruitment for jobs, validation of degrees and diplomas and informal learning. Some known issues need to be worked out in a broader perspective, like long-lived authentication services for students leaving academia. There is an idea to set up an organization which would disseminate the results of EMREX, EWP and other similar initiatives and would support on-line data transfer and other ways of integration of higher education information systems. A live demo of EMREX will be performed during the session.

The Future is Being Made Today! Digital Cross Border Enrolment in Europe

10:15 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

DUO and AHOVOKS (agencies of the Dutch and Belgian/Flanders MoE) are working together since 2013 in a project which aims at making the cross border process of enrolment of students digital. There are two essential preconditions for this cross border process: the authentication of the student and the safe transport of data. DUO and AHOVOKS want to use the new “building stones” of the European large scale project eSENS: eID for the authentication of the student and eDelivery for the safe transport of student data. DUO participates in an eDelivery project for setting up the Dutch National Acces Point (NAP). This project will start in the second half of 2016. DUO provides the use case for sending student data through this infrastructure. Dutch and Belgian governmental institutions are setting up a project for the cross border authentication of students. The preparations take place in 2016-2017. So the two building stones eID and eDelivery will be available for the Dutch-Flemish enrolment project in the fall of 2017. In the meanwhile AHOVOKS and DUO have developed a safe temporary solution for both authentication and the transport of data. Rik Vercammen and Jan Otten will unveal this solution in their presentation.

Verifdiploma and the French Ministry of Education Project on Digital Authentication

10:30 a.m.-10:45 a.m.

Verifdiploma was established in 2001 in France in partnership with the French Higher Education Institutions (universities, business schools, engineering schools...) and also supported by French institutional bodies. Itsservices are available on the internet, to better inform recruiters on the courses, to provide degree verification service and to assist in the recruitment process of graduates and trainees. Veridiploma has developed the largest French national database of graduates (4.5 million) and courses (15,000). Those services are implemented with institutions for free and funded by businesses that use these services. In 2015 it created 2 new platforms for institutional registrars to provide digital documents: VERIFCENTER to handle all requests for verifications and DOCCENTER to manage electronic documents for the exchange with students. In January 2016, the French Minister of Education announced the launch of a digital authentication of degree for all of French national graduates with a possible verification service on the website www.diplome.gouv.fr

Common Q&A pannel for pilots

noon.-noon.

UNESCO Keynote: Groningen, Qingdao, Cape Town? On Education 2030 Digital Vision and the Contribution of the Groningen Declaration

11:30 a.m.-noon

The key note address will explore areas of connections between Education 2030 Agenda and the Groningen Declaration. It sets out the main opportunities and offers recommendations for actions to be taken in the near future.
The international community has set an ambitious 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It calls for an integrated approach to development. Education and training are central to the achievement of the 2030 Agenda as reflected in the Sustainable Development Goal 4 “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”.
As the world is working to implement the new Agenda and meet the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), there is an urgent need to mobilise the data revolution for all people and the whole planet in order to monitor progress, enable individuals, public and private institutions, and companies to make choices that are good for them and for the world they live in.
Information and Communication Technologies are also central for achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 4. The Digital Vision for Education 2030 is fully captured by the Qingdao Declaration on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in education which was approved at the conclusion of the conference on ICT for the 2030 Education Agenda held in Qingdao, China. The Declaration outlines how technology can be used to achieve educational targets for equity, access, quality and lifelong learning. It stresses that increasing efforts have to be made to promote the culture of open educational resources and the need to ensure quality assurance and recognition of online learning. It encourages governments, industry partners and all other education stakeholders to join forces and share resources to create equitable, dynamic, accountable, and sustainable learner-centered digital learning ecosystems.  
The opportunity to improve the data that is essential for recognition of skills and qualifications is timely. With its focus on learners and how graduates can document their learning attainments making use of 21st Century technological capabilities, the Groningen Declaration is fully aligned wThe key note address will explore areas of connections between Education 2030 Agenda and the Groningen Declaration. It sets out the main opportunities and offers recommendations for actions to be taken in the near future. The international community has set an ambitious 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It calls for an integrated approach to development. Education and training are central to the achievement of the 2030 Agenda as reflected in the Sustainable Development Goal 4 “Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”. As the world is working to implement the new Agenda and meet the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), there is an urgent need to mobilise the data revolution for all people and the whole planet in order to monitor progress, enable individuals, public and private institutions, and companies to make choices that are good for them and for the world they live in. Information and Communication Technologies are also central for achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 4. The Digital Vision for Education 2030 is fully captured by the Qingdao Declaration on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in education which was approved at the conclusion of the conference on ICT for the 2030 Education Agenda held in Qingdao, China. The Declaration outlines how technology can be used to achieve educational targets for equity, access, quality and lifelong learning. It stresses that increasing efforts have to be made to promote the culture of open educational resources and the need to ensure quality assurance and recognition of online learning. It encourages governments, industry partners and all other education stakeholders to join forces and share resources to create equitable, dynamic, accountable, and sustainable learner-centered digital learning ecosystems.   The opportunity to improve the data that is essential for recognition of skills and qualifications is timely. With its focus on learners and how graduates can document their learning attainments making use of 21st Century technological capabilities, the Groningen Declaration is fully aligned with the guiding principles and framework for actions of the Education 2030 and the Qingdao Declaration. The key note address will explore the actions required to leverage the potential of the Groningen Declaration taking advantage of the current political opportunities with a focus on four key areas of discussion: Normative instruments and standards; technology, innovation and analysis; capacity and resources; leadership and governance.ith the guiding principles and framework for actions of the Education 2030 and the Qingdao Declaration.
The key note address will explore the actions required to leverage the potential of the Groningen Declaration taking advantage of the current political opportunities with a focus on four key areas of discussion: Normative instruments and standards; technology, innovation and analysis; capacity and resources; leadership and governance.

Panel Discussion: GDN Mid-Term Vision 2020

noon-1 p.m.

DRAFT ABSTRACT. The GDN Mid-Term Vision Task Force will present its draft Mid Term GDN Vision to the participants and elicit your input and feedback so as to ensure that the GDN Vision tallies with our networks ambitions and aspirations. Central issues on the table will be: Does the GDN fill in on a need? If so, how to make it financially sustainable? Does this require formal legal status? What other needs can be identified? What might then be our mid term goals?

Panel Discussion: Empowering Cross Border Enrolment and Student Loan Portability

2:15 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

The Task Force Empowering Cross Border Enrolment and Student Loan Portability aims to help minimize the administrative burden for all parties involved in international student mobility and to facilitate the educational pursuits of bona fide candidates. Always in strict compliance with privacy regulations in jurisdictions around the globe, the Task Force is focusing on the following particular processes to improve efficiency and integrity: •Verifying enrolment data; •Identifying double student loan claims; •Confirming scholarships and other relevant types of government funding; •Enabling students and their sponsors to document their financial capacity DUO-AHOVOKS Pilot As its first tangible deliverable, the Task Force will highlight the outcomes of a DUO-AHOVOKS (Netherlands - Belgium/Flanders) Pilot. The European Union Student Loan Portability Scheme allows European students to use their loan for the purpose of studying abroad, so long as the student can document his enrolment. DUO and AHOVOKS now execute enrolment verification digitally for Dutch students in Flanders, yielding a tremendous reduction of the administrative burden on the student, the HEIs involved and DUO. This process will soon extend to Flemish students studying in the Netherlands as well. After verifying the enrolment of students, the result of the enrolment (the degree acquired) is also part of the data exchange between both parties, thus reducing the administrative burden significantly. During the session, the Task Force will give a presentation showcasing this pilot and presenting the results after exchanging data for the last two years, with ample time for Q&A upon completion of the presentation.

Task Force Action Plan Presentations

2:45 p.m.-3 p.m.

Quick elevator pitches by TF chairs to grab the interest of new recruits for the GDN Task Forces: * Business Case - Rick Torres * Dissemination - Victoriano Giralt * Empowering Cross Border Enrolment and Student Loan Portability - Evi Verduyckt * Mid Term Vision 2020 - Michael Sessa * Pilots - Dik van der Wal * Verification Policies and Best Practices - Navin Vasudev

Annual Report

3 p.m.-3:15 p.m.

The Annual Report for the period May-2015 - May-2016 was read during the meeting and is available here.

Closing Keynote: Qualification Passports, Virtual Learning Environment and Blockchain Technology

3:15 p.m.-3:45 p.m.

Unexpected peaks in mobility numbers call for unorthodox methods in the recognition community. At the height of the refugee crisis in Europe, when more than 1 million migrants had arrived at Europe's shores by mid December 2015, novel approaches to screening, mapping and recognition had to be charted. These will be investigated and described, with a main focus on the novel European Qualification Passport for Refugees EQPR and Kiron, and a cursory look at how Open Badges and Blockchain technology could come in: What if the combination of these new departures and new technologies would be available to refugees across Europe, to continuously store and update their education achievements wherever these were obtained. Presenters will explain how this might play out, thus possibly providing a seamless recognition tool that could decisively facilitate the movement of refugees throughout Europe.

Concluding Remarks, Feedback and Sneak Preview of 2017 Venue by 2017 Host

3:45 p.m.-4:29 p.m.

Close of Meeting by GDN President

4:29 p.m.-4:30 p.m.